‘Zooetics’ is a word in progress to explore new ways of engaging human knowledge and research with other forms of life and to imagine designs, prototypes and interfaces for future interspecies ecologies. Zooetics encompasses all life from mammals to mollusks to microbes, and addresses the paradigm shift in science, culture and society proposed in the argument of the Anthropocene. It engages with shifts in contemporary understandings of nature.

Zooetics as a platform addresses the site specificity of the Technology University in Kaunas where the campus is historically negotiating its borders with the National Zoo.

Zooetics launched with a series of public keynote lectures in December 2014. There is an evolving online Glossary and Reading Group, open to participation. A series of practice-led research workshops will take place over the next few years. An exhibition and symposium will be held at MIT, Cambridge, US in 2017. A book will be published in 2018. Zooetics eventually will serve as a pilot project leading to the launch of a new research institution in Kaunas in 2018.

Nomeda & Gediminas Urbonas Talk on the Project Zooetics

BY The Editor
12.09.2016

Nomeda and Gediminas Urbonas explain the origin and references present in the Zooetics Pavilion, an experimental project that unites human and other lifeforms knowledges with art. Interview by Lars Bang Larsen at the São Paulo Art Biennial.

Original text by Sao Paulo Bienial.

 

Lars – Last year you began to work on the Zooetics project. And your work for Incerteza Viva is a manifestation of this project. So, what is Zooethics?

Nomeda – Actually we started Zooetics more than a year ago, perhaps already a couple of years or even more. And that is a long term engagement. Zooetics tries to weave together different types of knowledge: human knowledge, the knowledge of other life forms and poetics. It meant to become an educational program. So we collaborated with the university, Technological University in Lithuania, to create kind of a new type of department or even a body within the university, where those three types of knowledge could coexist and be practiced. So basically our task at the beginning was to develop a common language for artists and for scientists. That was supposed to be a program within the University of Technology but really looking at different matters through the lens of artistic methodologies.

Gediminas – Also we argue that Zooetics weaves together Non-Ethics and poetics. And as we know Non-Ethics is the system of thinking, of beliefs, that may also break through systems of knowledge that are acceptable. So for us this combination of different types of knowledge is also to change the logic of scientific research. I also think that Zooetics comes from our interest in the system theory and, to be more precise, also in the hybrid systems. And that is inspired by several genealogies. One of those is art and science collaborations, that basically we can say that are also inspired by the cybernetics discourse that emerges in the Cold War. We also are interested in the Cold War confrontation that gave the impetus and the starting point, if you will, for the modern forms of culture. We have also the emergence of the first arts and science collectives, that questions the paradigm of science. Within the Zooetics research, we also observe this hybrids when we look at Mycelium, for example, which is the roots of the mushroom. So the Mycelium is a very powerful network and has been known for years, thanks to scientists like Paul Stamets and others, for its ability to colonize and turn other species into hybrids, like insects or like algae. So for us to think of this hybrids and of the collectives is one of the core thoughts engaging with the Zooetics research. And when we think of the spaces that produce knowledge or the spaces where the experimentation with knowledge production takes place, of course the first thing that comes to our mind is the laboratories (the laboratories if you look at the idea of Varela’s portable laboratory). Those are the instruments that also develop specific methodologies and gestures that lead to methodologies. So for us Zooetics Pavillion is, first of all, a place for experimentation in which we as artists are in the dialogue with scientists and in the dialog and in confrontation with other fields. And in this case we are in dialogue, we are flirting, we are negotiating not only with biotechnology but also with the culture of what we could describe as a Maker Culture. So in that sense it is a space where we want to appropriate something that belongs to the experts, like biotechnology, and democratize that process by bringing it to the general audience. But we also want to make it accessible, we want to make this knowledge, if you will, open source. Also through the process of creating a educational space. So there is another flirt, there is another relationship with the ideas that inspired the phenomena that come from the radical pedagogy and the phenomena that come from this thinking about educational spaces or what we can call learning environments. And of course it is thrilling to speak about learning environments in a place like São Paulo and Brazil where we have such people like Paulo Freire. So for us Zooetics Pavillion is a place that is experimenting with forms of pedagogy and it is also experimenting with materials.

Lars – The complete title of the work is “Psychotropic House – Zooetics Pavillion of Ballardian Technologies. What are the “Ballardian technologies”?

Nomeda – We really like this direct reference to Ballard and, in particular, maybe we were inspired by Vermillion Sands, his collection of novels from 1971, where he describes all this kind of crazy, very sensitive technologies but also at the same time it provokes a critical view maybe towards the contemporary biotechnological sciences.

Gediminas – There is a strong link in which we are interested between the experiments with art and technology and the interest in the science fiction literature, for example. Ballard is a British science fiction writer that writes Vermillion Sands at the same time brothers Strugatsky, in the other side of the Iron Curtain, the Russian writers, write Roadside Picnic, the book that inspired Tarkovsky to make the Stalker movie. In that book they describe a zone that was led by extraterrestrials visiting Earth and leaving those very obscure artifacts that are not yet known by humans. But with all our curiosity they give a knowledge to us to understand questions of the universe, but at the same time touching those objects and revealing them can be very dangerous for humanity. For us it is really interesting that Ballard, for example, in Vermillion Sands, also describes intelligent systems, systems that also maybe speak to bio-empathy. And this is exactly happening in 71 – 72, when we have, perhaps on the global scale, the movement that can be described as the Environmentalism. And this is being born in the time of what is called the Techno-Humanism, where there is also a believe that with the help of new technologies we can better connect with the environment. Not only better connect, but we are part of the same system. An idea that perhaps after 50 years we are no longer sure about. So for us it is really interesting, first of all, how the ideas that come from science fiction gave impetus to specific modern forms in culture and technology, and then how those ideas, specially the ideas in the technological developments, somehow manage to subvert the cultures.

Diana Dobranszky / Instagram

Lars – Can you talk a bit about the cultural significance and cultural context of mushrooms in Lithuania?

Nomeda – We have a big mushroom culture and we always had it. We remember ourselves since childhood we would go to the forest at a certain time of the year during the weekends. Actually today we were discussing how come we knew which mushrooms are edible and which are not, but as long as I remember myself I would be able to go to the forest and feed myself from what I find there. Now I can say one thing in Lithuanian: Jai ne grybai ir ne uogos dzūkų mergos būtų nuogos. Which means: if not because of mushrooms and berries, the girls from Dzūkija (a certain region in Lithuania) would be naked. And there is a tradition up to nowadays of mushroom picking. And we were thinking: isn’t it still this kind of relationship which you have with indigenous knowledge, almost? Which in many other countries and many other regions in the world is simply lost. If you go to Scandinavia, Norway or Sweden you will find lots of mushrooms, very big, beautiful ones, but no one picks them. People just don’t have this habit and they don’t recognize them and they go to the store and buy Chanterelles from Lithuania.

Gediminas – Certainly there is a very strong proximity with the indigenous. And I think it comes from this proximity to the biggest, largest forest and oldest forest in Europe. I think it also make some traditions more secure. And if we speak about this cultural traditions, there are a lot of beliefs, lot of fairytales that perhaps also supports that desire of discovering yourself in the nature or through the nature. For sure there is economy and they still maintain this tradition of foraging and mushroom hunting, making the preserves for the winter time, exchanging those as a gift between one another, but I think it is not only about securing the income, I think it really has to do with this self discovery, self recognition, self exploration, if you will. Being in the forest and trying to figure out your routes, getting lost in the forest. Hunting mushrooms is also like a lottery. It is not only that you find those that are poisonous and those that are edible, but it is also where you find them and getting to know the nature and also developing the consciousness of how you cut them and how you take them, what you need to leave in the forest. So this all makes you more sensible and attuned within the system of invisible wires that are being transmitted in the nature by the different objects. Which we, as brothers Strugatsky suggested, we don’t know fully yet.

Source: www.32bienal.org.br

Tags: Incerteza Viva, Live Uncertainty, Mycelium, Pavilhão de Zooética, São Paulo Art Biennial

Psychotropic House: Activation at the 32nd São Paulo Bienial

BY The Editor
08.09.2016

The new edition of Psychotropic House: Zooetics Pavilion of Ballardian Technologies opened at the São Paulo Bienial. It is located on the first floor of the Bienial Pavilion in the Ibirapuera park / 3rd gate on Avenue Pedro Álvares Cabral.

The 32nd São Paulo Biennale will play host to an installation of objects created by an unusual “designer”: the vegetative fungus mycelium. Students and professors at ACT, the Art, Culture and Technology programme at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), grew the fungus—proposed as an alternative to plastic—to create objects that aim to “consider the role of cross-species technologies and our interaction with them”, explains Laura Knott, the consulting curator of ACT. The result is the installation The Psychotropic House: Zooetics Pavilion of Ballardian Technologies, which will show the collaborative efforts of the academics (and the fungus) in a space created to resemble a laboratory. The installation expresses “the idea that humans are a part of this web of experience that includes living and non-living forms”, Knott says.

The installation draws inspiration from the short-stories found in “Vermilion Sands” (1971), a science fiction book by English author J. G. Ballard, which imagines a world where technological devices would be alive and sentient, such as a house capable of responding to the emotional states of its inhabitants. The work presented at the 32nd Bienal provides the concept of a future in which objects can not only be constructed but also cultivated by its human inhabitants and users – and vice versa. Using mycelium, the part of the fungus responsible for the absorption of nutrients, oxygen, and energy in a symbiotic relationship with other cultures and materials, participants can create their own biotechnological artifacts (mycomorphs), promoting mycelium’s interaction with sugar cane bagasse, corn pollard or eucalyptus saw dust.

Through a collaborative action with visitors a laboratory is constructed in the exhibition space. In this place of experimentation, efforts are made to build possible prototypes or interfaces that are part of new forms of ecological coexistence. During the exhibition, Gediminas and Nomeda Urbonas host workshops that combine theory and practice. The 32nd São Paulo Bienial edition of Psychotropic House – Casa Psicotrópica – lasts until the 10th of December, 2016.

For more information visit official São Paulo Biennale website. Sources: Bienial Sao Paulo, MIT/ACT 

Tags: Casa Psicotrópica, Incerteza Viva, Live Uncertainty, Mycelium, São Paulo Art Biennial

Zooetics: A series of public lectures at Kaunas University of Technology

Zooetics began as an attempt to reinvent and rethink by weaving together human knowledge, the knowledge of other life forms, and poetics, without fully envisaging or knowing where that might go. In 2014, the first Zooetics lectures reevaluated and recombined the concepts: Anthropocene, Nature and Interspecies. In the second Zooetics lecture series in 2015 researchers Keller Easterling, Dimitris Papadopoulos and Matthew Fuller collide and elide radical ideas on spatial thinking, makers culture and human/other life interfaces.

Zooetics is a research expedition towards the knowledge of non-human life, using art and poetics – ‘infectious stories’ (Easterling), ‘a sensing into’ (Fuller), imaginaries of ‘communities of species’ (Papadopoulos), close encounters and proximities – to try to cross into this apparently impenetrable terrain.

Registration for the event here.

Podcasts of the lectures and discussions from the lecture series in 2014 are available below on this site.

Zooetics II

Thursday 1 October 2015

6 - 9 pm KTU “Santaka” Valley, K. Baršausko 59, Kaunas, Lithuania
Keller Easterling, Matthew Fuller, Dimitris Papadopoulos

Nature / Interspecies / Anthropocene

Friday 19 December 2014

1.00 p.m. - 4.30 p.m. KTU “Santaka” Valley, K. Baršausko 59, Kaunas, Lithuania
Timothy Morton, Jae Rhim Lee and John Palmesino & Ann-Sofi Rönnskog

Nature

Friday 12 December 2014

6.00 p.m. - 8.30 p.m. KTU “Santaka” Valley, K. Baršausko 59, Kaunas, Lithuania
Skylar Tibbits and Caleb Harper

Anthropocene / Interspecies

Friday 5 December 2014

6.00 p.m. - 8.00 p.m. KTU “Santaka” Valley, K. Baršausko 59, Kaunas, Lithuania
Christian Schwägerl and Natalie Jeremijenko

Workshop Programme 2015 – 2016

A series of workshops will be organised with small interdisciplinary research groups undertaking practice-based research. The research workshops will involve artists, architects, designers, engineers and technologists. The information regarding the workshops is still subject to change and will be updated soon. There will be a limited number of places open to postgraduate student and other researchers. Details on the application process will be announced soon.

Zooetics: an active glossary compiled and edited by Jutempus

This glossary is evolving alongside the Zooetics project. If you would like to contribute please register as a user by sending us an email with a paragraph about yourself to info@zooetics.net. You will receive a login and password from us.

The glossary aims to serve as a discursive and reflective tool supporting a transparent research process. It does not aim to be authoritative or to duplicate existing accessible sources but rather to act as a repository capturing the research process, continually updating and extending by enabling contributions from many perspectives and many voices. The development of the glossary will be punctuated by regular reflections on the accumulating material by invited writers and artists.

This is an active glossary with suggested short reading texts and invited comments. Contributors can contribute comments to existing terms, suggest new terms for the list, comment on suggested reading group texts, suggest new sources for the bibliography. Comments can be textual, visual, moving image, sonic. All contributions should be authored, rather than anonymous.

Definitions have drawn on dictionaries, encyclopedias and authoritative sources relating to the topic (such as the IPCC or the Anthropocene Working Group) and on published literature in a range of disciplines (detailed in the Bibliography).

Views expressed are the contributor’s own. New comments will be submitted to the glossary editors for approval and anything anonymous, offensive, abusive, promotional, or irrelevant will not be posted.

Contributors:

Viktorija Siaulyte, Jutempus

Gediminas Urbonas, Jutempus

Nomeda Urbonas, Jutempus

Tracey Warr, Jutempus

Bibliography

Allison, Ian et al (2009) The Copenhagen Diagnosis http://www.copenhagendiagnosis.com

Alley, Richard (2002) Abrupt Climate Change: Inevitable Surprises, Washington, DC: National Academies Press.

Arroyo, Vicki (2012) ‘Let’s Prepare for our New Climate’ http://www.ted.com/talks/vicki_arroyo_let_s_prepare_for_our_new_climate

Bachelard, Gaston (1994) The Poetics of Space, Boston: Beacon Press.

Ballard, J. G. (1971) Vermilion Sands, London: Berkeley.

Banks, Iain M. (2012) The Hydrogen Sonata, London: Orbit.

Bateson, Gregory (1972) Steps to an Ecology of Mind, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Beck, Ulrich (2008) World at Risk, Cambridge: Polity Press.

Benyus, Janine (2002) Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature, New York: Harper Perennial.

Bennett, Jill (2012) ‘No. 053: Living in the Anthropocene’, documenta(13) Catalogue 1/3: The Book of Books: 100 Notes – 100 Thoughts, Ostfildern: Hatje Cantz, pp. 345-347.

Burroughs, William (2005) Climate Change in Pre-History, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Calarco, Matthew (2008) Zoographies: The Question of the Animal from Heidegger to Derrida, New York: Columbia University Press.

Chamberlain, Shaun & Heinberg, Richard (2009) Transition Timeline, Green Books.

Coates, Marcus (2002) Marcus Coates, Ambleside: Grizedale.

Dalby, Simon (2009) Security and Environmental Change, Cambridge: Polity.

Deleuze, Gilles (2003), Proust and Signs (trans. Richard Howard), Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Dennis, Kingsley & Urry, John (2009) After the Car, Cambridge: Polity.

Derrida, Jacques (2002) ‘The Animal That Therefore I Am (More to Follow)’, trans. David Wills, Critical Inquiry, 28, Winter, pp. 369- 418.

Deutsches Museum with the Rachel Carson Centre for the Environment (2014) Anthropocene: Nature and Technology in the Age of Humans, exhibition http://quaternary.stratigraphy.org/meetings/Deutsches%20Museum%20Exhibit.pdf

Dick, Philip K. (1969) Ubik, New York: Doubleday.

Dukes, Paul (2011) Minutes to Midnight: History and the Anthropocene Era from 1763, London: Anthem Press.

Easterling, Keller (2014) Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space, London: Verso Books.

Easterling, Keller (2014) Critical Spatial Practice 4: Subtraction, Berlin: Sternberg Press.

European Space Agency (2009) Innovative Technologies from Science Fiction http://www.esa.int/esapub/br/br176/br176.pdf

Fishman, Charles (2011) The Big Thirst: The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water, New York: Free Press.

Fromm, Erich (1973) The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness, Harmondsworth: Penguin. 

Fuller, Matthew (2010), ‘Art for animals’, Journal of Visual Art Practice 9: 1, pp. 17–33.

Fuller, Matthew Media Ecologies: Materialist Energies in Art and Technoculture, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.

Greenfort, Tue (2012) http://tuegreenfort.net/post/34698314235/the-worldly-house-2012-walking-through-the

Group on Earth Observations (GEO) http://www.earthobservations.org

Grosz, Elizabeth, ‘Art and the Animal’ http://visrfreeschool.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/grosz-art-and-the-animal.pdf

Grove, Jean (1988) The Little Ice Age, London: Routledge.

Guattari, Félix (2000), The Three Ecologies (trans. Ian Pindar and Paul Sutton), London: Athlone.

Hamilton, Clive (2013) Earthmasters: The Dawn of the Age of Climate Engineering, New Haven: Yale University Press.

Hamilton, Clive (2010) Requiem for a Species: Why We Resist the Truth about Climate Change, Sydney: Allen & Unwin.

Haraway, Donna J. (2008) When Species Meet, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota. 

Heinberg, Richard (2007) Peak Everything, London: Clairview Books. 

Heinberg, Richard (2004) Powerdown: Options and Actions for a Post-Carbon World, Gabriola Island, BC: New Society Publishers. 

Hibbard, K. A. et al (2006) Decadal interactions of humans and the environment. In Integrated History and Future of People on Earth, eds. R. Costanza, L. Graumlich & W. Steffen, Dahlem Workshop Report 96, Boston, MA: MIT Press, pp. 341–375.

Hoban, Russell (1980) Riddley Walker, London: Jonathan Cape.

Hopkins, Rob (2014) ‘Transition Culture’ https://www.transitionnetwork.org

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change http://www.ipcc.ch

Jeremijenko, Natalie http://environmentalhealthclinic.net/

Jeremijenko, Natalie (2006), ‘OOZ : a place to see and observe animals’, http:// www.nyu.edu/projects/xdesign/ooz/

Jones, Caroline A. (2006) Sensorium: Embodied Experience, Technology and Contemporary Art, Boston, Mass.: MIT Press/MIT List Visual Art Center.

Klanten, Robert & Feiress, Lukas, eds. (2011) Utopia Forever: Visions of Architecture and Urbanism, Berlin: Die Gestalten Verlag.

Klein, Naomi (2014) This Changes Everything, London: Allen Lane.

Kolbert, Elizabeth (2011) ‘Enter the Anthropocene – Age of Man’, National Geographic http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2011/03/age-of-man/kolbert-text

Kolbert, Elizabeth (2010) ‘The Anthropocene Debate: Marking Humanity’s Impact’, Yale Environment 360 http://e360.yale.edu/feature/the_anthropocene_debate__marking_humanitys_impact/2274/

Kolbert, Elizabeth (2009) ‘The Copenhagen Diagnosis’, Yale 360 http://e360.yale.edu/feature/the_copenhagen_diagnosis_sobering_update_on_the_science/2214/

Laland, Kevin N. and Bennet G. Galef (2009). The Question of Animal Culture. Cambridge: Harvard UP.

Latour, Bruno (2014a) ‘Agency at the Time of the Anthropocene’, New Literary History, 45, pp. 1-18.

Latour, Bruno (2014b) ‘Anthropocene Monument’ exhibition and symposium, Les Abbattoirs, Toulouse
http://www.lesabattoirs.org/en/expositions/anthropocene-monument

Latour, Bruno (2013) ‘Thinking the Anthropocene’, Draft Lecture http://www.bruno-latour.fr/sites/default/files/131-ANTHROPOCENE-PARIS-11-13.pdf

Le Guin, Ursula K. (1976) The Word for World is Forest, New York: Putnam.

Lessing, Doris (1979) Shikasta, London: Jonathan Cape.
Lovelock, James (2014) A Rough Ride to the Future, London: Allen Lane.

Lynas, Mark (2007) Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet, London: Fourth Estate.

McCarthy, Cormac (2006) The Road, New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Martinelli, Dario http://www.zoosemiotics.helsinki.fi

Martinelli, Dario (2010) A Critical Companion to Zoosemiotics, Berlin: Springer.

Martinez, Chus (2012) ‘How a Tadpole Became a Frog’, documenta 13

MOMA (2010) Rising Currents: Projects for New York’s Waterfronts, Museum of Modern Art, New York, exhibition http://www.moma.org/explore/inside_out/category/rising-currents

Monbiot, George (2013) Feral, London: Penguin.

Morton, Timothy (2007) Ecology Without Nature, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Morton, Timothy (2013) Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology after the End of the World, Minneapolis?London: University of Minnesota Press.

Nagel, Thomas (1974) ‘What is it like to be a bat?’ The Philosophical Review, Vol. 83, No. 4., Oct., pp. 435-450. http://faculty.arts.ubc.ca/maydede/mind/Nagel_Whatisitliketobeabat.pdf

Nordenson, Kurt & Seavitt, Catherine (2013) ‘High Risk: Art, Environment, Crisis’, Artforum, special issue ‘Second Nature’, September.

Oldfield, Frank (2005) Environmental Change: Key Issues and Alternative Perspectives, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Papadopoulos, Dimitris (2014) Generation M.: Matter, Makers, Microbiomes::Compost for Gaia http://eipcp.net/n/1392050604

Pawlyn, Michael (2011) Biomimicry in Architecture, London: RIBA.

Pearce, Fred (2007) With Speed and Violence: Why Scientists Fear Tipping Points in Climate Change, Boston, Massachusetts: Beacon Press.

Powers, Richard (2014) Orfeo, New York: W. W. Norton.

Rafferty, John P. (2014) ‘Anthropocene Epoch’, Encyclopaedia Britannica Online http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/1492578/Anthropocene-Epoch

Raskin, Paul et al (2002) Great Transition: The Promise and Lure of the Times Ahead, Boston: Stockholm Environment Institute. http://www.tellus.org/documents/Great_Transition.pdf

Robinson, Kim Stanley (2004) Forty Signs of Rain, New York: Harper Collins.

Rockstrom, Johan (2010) ‘Let the Environment Guide Our Development’ http://www.ted.com/talks/johan_rockstrom_let_the_environment_guide_our_development

Roof, Judith (2007) The Poetics of DNA, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Royal Society (2009) Geoengineering the Climate: Science, Governance and Uncertainty, London: Royal Society.

Ruddiman, William F. (2005) Plows, Plagues, and Petroleum: How Humans Took Control of Climate. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.

Scarry, Elaine (2011) Thinking in an Emergency, New York: W. W. Norton.

Schwägerl, Christian (2014a) 11 Looming Wars: A Scenario Exercise http://christianschwaegerl.com/en/11-drohende-kriege-ein-szenerienbuch/

Schwägerl, Christian (2014b) The Anthropocene: A New Planet Shaped by Humans, London: Synergetic Press.

Serres, Michel (2012) Biogea, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Serres, Michel (2007) The Parasite, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Smuts, Barbara (1985) Sex and Friendship in Baboons, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Smuts, Barbara (2001) ‘Encounters with Animal Minds’, Journal of Consciousness Studies, 8, nos. 5-7, pp. 293-309.

Smuts, Barbara (2011) ‘Embodied Communication in Nonhuman Animals’ in Human Development in the 21st Century: Visionary Policy Ideas from Systems Scientists, ed. Alan Fogel, Barbara King & Stuart Shanker, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Snyder, Gary (1990), The Practice of the Wild, New York: North Point.

Sorrell, S., Speirs, J., Bentley, R., Brandt, A. & Miller, R. (2009), An Assessment of the Evidence for a Near-term Peak in Global Oil Production. London: Energy Research Centre.

Steffen, Will; Grinevald, Jacques; Crutzen, Paul & McNeill, John (2011) ‘The Anthropocene: Conceptual and Historical Perspectives’, Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society, 369, pp. 842-867.

Strum, Shirley (1987) Almost Human: A Journey into the World of Baboons, New York: Random House.

Strum, Shirley & Fedigan, Linda Marie, eds., (2000) Primate Encounters, Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

United Nations Environment Program (2009) Climate Change Science Compendium 2009.

Watts, Jonathan & Ford, Liz (2012) ‘Rio+20 Earth Summit: campaigners decry final document’, The Guardian, 23 June http://www.theguardian.com/environment/2012/jun/23/rio-20-earth-summit-document

Welcome to the Anthropocene http://www.anthropocene.info/en/home

Wilson, E.O. (2002) ‘The bottleneck’, Scientific American, February, pp. 82-91.

Wolfe, Cary, ed. (2003) Zoontologies: The Question of the Animal, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Working Group on the Anthropocene http://quaternary.stratigraphy.org/workinggroups/anthropocene/

Zalasiewicz, Jan; Williams, Mark; Steffen, Will & Crutzen, Paul (2010) ‘The New World of the Anthropocene’, Environmental Science & Technology, 44, pp. 2228-2231.

About

Zooetics is a 5 year long art-led interdisciplinary research project organized by Jutempus Interdisciplinary Art Program within the framework of the Frontiers in Retreat network.

logo-stamp-sm-B-600

Authors

The Zooetics organizing committee:


Gediminas Urbonas, artist and professor at the MIT Program in Art, Culture & Technology, Cambridge, USA
http://act.mit.edu/about-act/history/

Nomeda Urbonas, artist and PhD fellow at the Norwegian University of Science & Technology, Norway
http://www.nugu.lt/us

Dr Tracey Warr, writer and senior lecturer at Oxford Brookes University, UK

http://traceywarrwriting.com

Viktorija Siaulyte, curator and researcher at Jutempus Interdisciplinary Art Program, Lithuania

http://www.vilma.cc/jutempus/

Credits

Design: NODE Berlin Oslo
Programming: André Pahl

Zooetics is part of the outreach and education programme of Frontiers in Retreat (EACEA 2013-1297) project.

This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This website reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein.

This project is made possible by funding provided by:
Ministry of Culture of the Republic of Lithuania; Lithuanian Council for Culture; Lithuania‘s Agency for Science, Innovation and Technology (MITA)

Zooetics lecture series and seminars are co-produced with Kaunas University of Technology (KTU).

ktu_logo_en